@musictechsolve: Will Digital Aggregators Lead the Industry on Transparency with Spotify and Others?

The Music Managers Forum UK have criticized the “secrecy” arounds Spotify’s deals with major labels. According to Complete Music Update: The UK’s Music Managers Forum yesterday welcomed the news that Spotify had reached a new deal with Universal Music. However, the trade body criticised the continued secrecy that surrounds the deals made between the major […]

via Will Digital Aggregators Lead the Industry on Transparency with Spotify and Others? — Music Tech Solutions

@musictechsolve: Five Things Congress Can Do to Stop Tens of Millions of “Address Unknown” NOIs

 

March Spotify NOI Filings

Amazon, Google, Pandora, Spotify and other tech companies are taking advantage of their influence in the Library of Congress to leverage a loophole in the Copyright Act to their great benefit and to songwriters great harm. Congress can stop them overnight if the Congress will act.

via Five Things Congress Can Do to Stop Tens of Millions of “Address Unknown” NOIs — Music Tech Solutions

@jonesjourno: SONGWRITERS FIGHT APPLE, SPOTIFY, GOOGLE, AMAZON AND PANDORA OVER STREAMING RATES

Over 2,000 songwriters have signed a petition demanding better mechanical royalties for interactive streaming from Google, Apple, Amazon, Spotify and Pandora.

The campaign has launched ahead of a court hearing in Washington today (March 8) where the Copyright Royalty Board (CRB) will determine rates for the next five years.

The tech giants are expected to argue to reduce the amount they pay, while the National Music Publisher’s Association and the Nashville Songwriters Association International will lobby for an increase.

Read the post on MusicBusinessWorldwide

@hypebot: Music Industry Has Upper Hand As Spotify Faces Soaring Interest Rates, Stock Discounts

Last year when Spotify took on $1 billion in debt, we reported that it did so under terms that forced rate increases if it failed to IPO.  Now, those terms could force Spotify to IPO quickly, which leaves the music industry in a strong negotiating position.

Read the post on Hypebot

@stuartdredge: David Lowery Talks Digital Scepticism and Music-Streaming’s Future

David Lowery started the year in the headlines for leading one of two class-action lawsuits against Spotify over mechanical licensing. They have since combined with the other lawsuit taking prominence.

That has left Lowery free to continue with touring life with his two bands, Cracker and Camper Van Beethoven, but through his activism and The Trichordist blog, he remains closely engaged with the issues that sparked those lawsuits – and with the wider questions of fair streaming royalties.

“It’s pretty clear that the courts are going to do something with this: there’s going to be some sort of action. The NOI system for licensing streaming mechanicals in the United States is essentially broken. If we want to have streaming services that have more than a few million tracks on them, we can’t have that system,” says Lowery.

Read the post on Music Ally

@micahsingleton @benpopper: Spotify wants to bring on-demand features to its free mobile users

[Editor Charlie sez:  Spotify can’t account for millions of songs as it is, how will they give songwriters a straight count on “Jump In” feature?  Easy answer–they won’t.]

Spotify is testing a new feature called Jump In that would let its free mobile users get on-demand features in certain playlist, according to multiple sources with direct knowledge of the situation….

Spotify is currently in the midst of negotiations with all of the major labels, and those deals won’t be done anytime soon, according to multiple sources. Given that there are no deals in place, the company would need special approval to push Jump In, which could potentially alter or delay the rollout schedule.

Read the post on The Verge.