How Much is a Song Worth to Spotify Employees?

In case you were wondering what the value of songwriting is to Spotify, I think you can measure it pretty directly by the perks they hand out to their employees.  I’m sure creators are glad to provide the value that takes care of these folks–while they scrape for every fraction of a penny in Spotify’s many lawsuits.

Employee Benefits and Perquisites

Additional benefits received by our Swedish employees, including Messrs. Ek, Söderström, and Norström, include private healthcare, accident insurance, life and long-term disability insurance, travel insurance, and parental leave. Additional benefits received by our U.S. employees, including Mr. McCarthy and Ms. Ostroff [who has a $1,000,000 base salary], include medical, dental, and vision benefits, medical, and dependent care flexible spending accounts, short-term and long-term disability insurance, basic life insurance coverage, and parental leave. These benefits are provided to our named executive officers on the same general terms as they are provided to all of our full-time employees in the applicable countries.

We design our employee benefits programs to be affordable and competitive in relation to the market, as well as compliant with applicable laws and practices. We adjust our employee benefits programs as needed based upon regular monitoring of applicable laws and practices in the competitive market.

We do not view perquisites or other personal benefits as a significant component of our executive compensation program.

And then there’s the cash and stock, like the “Chief Content Officer” who must have line responsibility for the licensing incompetence and goal post moving:

Ostroff

Ek Covid

 

@stuartdredge: Meet CISAC’s new president, ABBA’s Björn Ulvaeus: ‘I’ll be outspoken!’

[Editor Charlie sez:  Great timing for Björn to step up to The MLC!]

CISAC is the global body representing collecting societies. Its last president was Jean-Michel Jarre, and before him it was Robin Gibb from the Bee Gees. Big shoes to fill for its next president, right?

Step forward… Björn Ulvaeus. The co-founder of ABBA will serve a three-year term as president of CISAC, having been elected by a meeting of its General Assembly this week.

He won’t be running the body – that’s director general Gadi Oron‘s job – but Ulvaeus’ role will be to support CISAC’s work around creator rights, royalties and technology in music and other artforms.

“They’ve told me that the presidency is what you make of it. I can give my views, and I can talk about things that I think are important, and maybe there will be some kind of debate. I can reach governments at this level, from CISAC,” Ulvaeus told Music Ally in an interview ahead of the announcement.

“I’ve been given free reign, and I will suspect that they will regret that they gave me free reign, maybe! I’ll be outspoken, I think. I find it very difficult to hold back and be diplomatic and like a politician.”

Read the post on MusicAlly

BMI Makes Early Royalty Distribution

BMI writers and publishers should have received this email:

 

We’re All in it Together: @USSupreme_Court Friend of Court Brief in Google v. Oracle by @helienne, @davidclowery, @theblakemorgan and @SGAWrites

[Editor Charlie sez:  The Oracle v. Google case is going to be the most important copyright case in a very, very long time.  Oracle won the case on appeal twice and Google got the Supreme Court to review.  The case is about two issues being copyright in software and whether Google’s taking of Oracle’s code is fair use and permissionless innovation.    Because of the fair use argument, this is not just some battle of tech companies because no one knows better than us that Google will take any win on fair use and push it even farther.

So all artists, songwriters, photographers, film makers, authors–all of us–are in the same boat with Oracle on this point.  Sure Oracle is a big company, but Google is an even bigger company with a trillion dollar market cap and Google is trying to roll over Oracle the same way they roll over us.

In a must read “friend of the court” brief, Helienne Lindvall, David Lowery, Blake Morgan and the Songwriters Guild of America make this case as independent artists, songwriters and labels all harmed by Google’s policies that are out of touch with the market starting with YouTube.

SCOTUS Brief Cover Page

As Beggars Group Chairman Martin Mills put it, “[P]olicing the YouTubes of this world for infringing content is a herculean task, one beyond all but the largest of companies. For my community, the independents, it’s a game of whack-a-mole they can only lose.”

Helienne, David, Blake and the SGA put that case squarely before the U.S. Supreme Court in this must-read friend of the court brief.]

Independent creators rely on copyright protection to safeguard their works. This is true not just of songwriters and composers, but of countless creators, including recording artists, photographers, filmmakers, visual artists, and software developers. Copyright is, in fact, of existential importance to such creators, who would be utterly lacking in market power and the ability to earn their livings without it.

Google’s business model is a prime example of the need for strong copyright protection. Since Google’s founding, Amici have experienced, observed and believe that Google has used its unprecedented online footprint to dictate the terms of the market for creative works. By tying together a set of limited exceptions and exclusions within the U.S. Copyright Act and analogous laws in other countries, and then advocating for the radical expansion of those exceptions, Google has amplified its own market power to the great detriment of copyright owners. Thus, where fair use is meant to be a limited defense to infringement founded on the cultural and economic good for both creators and the public, Google has throttled it into a business model.

Read the brief on the Supreme Court of the United States.

 

@digitalmusicnws: BMG Files Lawsuit Against Hilton Hotels After Hotel Chain Refuses to Take Down Infringing Works

After victory in the landmark BMG v. Cox case, BMG leads the way again and protects their songwriters.  The company really sets the gold standard for music publishers with strategic thinking and leadership in enforcing the rights of their songwriters and the composers of their production music catalog.

BMG has filed a lawsuit against Hilton Hotels in the United States.

Filed at the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York, the company’s Production Music division accused Hilton Worldwide Holdings of direct, contributory, and vicarious copyright infringement.

According to BMG, the hotel company has willfully “exploited” four of its copyrighted sound recordings and compositions in “infringing” YouTube and Facebook promotional videos.

The self-described “production music house” writes,

The Defendants benefited from the unauthorized use of those copyrighted works in connection with the promotion and advertisement of their products and services.  [They also] benefited from the unlicensed use of BMG’s unregistered songs in connection with the promotion and advertisement of their products and services.

Read the post on Digital Music News