@SamTalksIP: What the Legal Community is Saying About the Google v. Oracle Decision

[Editor Charlie sez: this is an important roundup of commentary about the Supreme Court’s failing in the Google v. Oracle case.]

On April 5, the Supreme Court published its decision in Google v. Oracle, a case that many expected to make a substantial impact in copyright law, specifically in how software code is protected. While the decision appears to have very limited applicability, many in the copyright community voiced concerns regarding how the case was decided and what the decision’s potential ramifications are. Below is a compilation of various reactions to this decision…

Read the post on Copyright Alliance

Must Read by @thatkatetaylor: Dishonest censorship scare may torpedo Bill C-10, a chance to update broadcasting laws for the modern era

[MTP readers may recall that I lived in Toronto and Montreal for many years and played with some of the Quebec and English Canadian artists as a member of Local 406. I try to keep an eye on what’s happening in the North. I can’t help noticing that Google lobbyists and fanboys are running the same old “but censorship!” play in Canada that they tried in Europe and the US. This is kind of ridiculous for the Kings of Algorithms at the Chocolate Factory. This post from Kate Taylor writing at the Globe and Mail sums it up nicely.]

If you believe my current Twitter feed, the Liberal government in Ottawa has misplaced its mind along with all democratic norms and is about to pass a law that will censor Canadians’ internet activity. Apparently, no funny cat video, let alone sneaky political GIF, will ever be safe again as Big Brother Justin rips page after page from China’s notoriously intrusive internet policies. One defiant wit, in the dying days of his free expression, recently posted an old socialist realist painting of Mao onto whose head he had cleverly morphed Justin Trudeau’s face. Meanwhile, in an opinion piece published in the National Post Saturday, Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole began quoting George Orwell, telling Canadians the Liberals might start monitoring their Facebook groups and their comments on news stories.

Well, the truth is that Trudeau and Mao share neither the same hairline nor the same politics. The alarm over supposed censorship is overblown and misplaced. It is fuelled by dishonest politicking from O’Toole and the Conservatives, and predictable paranoia from technological fundamentalists, those who believe the heaven-sent internet should not be subject to any human law – disinformation and election interference be damned.

Read the post on Apple News

@annyleshaw: Basquiat NFT Withdrawn from Auction After Artist’s Estate Intervenes [in Unauthorized Sale] — Artist Rights Watch

[Editor Charlie sez, I’m shocked, shocked that there are shenanigans in the NFT market. Good thing we have that transformational blockchain ledger thingie in the ether.]

An NFT of a drawing by Jean-Michel Basquiat has been withdrawn from sale on OpenSea after the late artist’s estate confirmed the seller does not own the licence or rights to the work. 

David Stark, the licensing agent who deals with Basquiat’s archive, tells The Art Newspaper: “The estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat owns the copyright in the artwork referenced. No license or rights were conveyed to the seller and the NFT has subsequently been removed from sale.”

The auction of the NFT of the 1986 mixed media work on paper, Free Comb with Pagoda, was sponsored by the little-known firm Daystrom, which had claimed the transaction would “memorialise ownership” as well as “reproduction and IP rights that will be sold to the highest bidder in perpetuity”. 

The winning bidder was also given the option to destroy the physical drawing—which raised issues about the artist’s moral rights.

Read the post on The Art Newspaper

@annyleshaw: Basquiat NFT Withdrawn from Auction After Artist’s Estate Intervenes [in Unauthorized Sale]

[Editor Charlie sez, I’m shocked, shocked that there are shenanigans in the NFT market. Good thing we have that transformational blockchain ledger thingie in the ether.]

An NFT of a drawing by Jean-Michel Basquiat has been withdrawn from sale on OpenSea after the late artist’s estate confirmed the seller does not own the licence or rights to the work. 

David Stark, the licensing agent who deals with Basquiat’s archive, tells The Art Newspaper: “The estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat owns the copyright in the artwork referenced. No license or rights were conveyed to the seller and the NFT has subsequently been removed from sale.”

The auction of the NFT of the 1986 mixed media work on paper, Free Comb with Pagoda, was sponsored by the little-known firm Daystrom, which had claimed the transaction would “memorialise ownership” as well as “reproduction and IP rights that will be sold to the highest bidder in perpetuity”. 

The winning bidder was also given the option to destroy the physical drawing—which raised issues about the artist’s moral rights.

Read the post on The Art Newspaper

New York Times: A Global Tipping Point for Reigning in Tech Has Arrived

China fined the internet giant Alibaba a record $2.8 billion this month for anticompetitive practices, ordered an overhaul of its sister financial company and warned other technology firms to obey Beijing’s rules.

Now the European Commission plans to unveil far-reaching regulations to limit technologies powered by artificial intelligence.

And in the United States, President Biden has stacked his administration with trustbusters who have taken aim at Amazon, Facebook and Google.

Around the world, governments are moving simultaneously to limit the power of tech companies with an urgency and breadth that no single industry had experienced before. 

Read the post on the New York Times