@vahn16: Popular Twitch Streamers Temporarily Banned For Playing Copyrighted Music

[Editor Charlie sez:  It’s about time that these royalty deadbeats began understanding the meaning of “repeat infringer policy” which Twitch does not seem to have in place at all.]

If you’ve watched any Twitch streams at all in your life ever, this might come as a surprise to you. After all, pretty much everybody on Twitch uses music. Sometimes it’s royalty-free, but it’s not uncommon to hear familiar hits during big streamers’ shows. Some streamers have playlists going in the background for the entirety of multi-hour streams. Others—Kotaku’s own channel included—put on some chill music before a stream is about to start, to let viewers know it’s time to tune in. To account for this, sometimes Twitch auto-mutes audio in portions of stream archives. Otherwise, people don’t usually get in trouble for it.

That doesn’t mean they can’t get in trouble for it, though. Twitch’s rules state that any content owned by somebody else is fair game for DMCA takedown if the owner decides to claim it. This applies to songs, as well as video clips and things of that nature—and even games like Persona 5, though publisher Atlus ultimately walked back its restrictions in that case.

Twitch keeps getting bigger and bigger, so it seems only natural that, at some point, big record labels and music companies would start cracking down.

Read the post on Kotaku

@digitalmusicnws: Mastodon’s Guitarist Says It’s Nearly Impossible for Bands to Survive Financially Anymore

It’s becoming extremely difficult for musicians to make a living these days —even successful and award-winning bands like Mastodon.

Mastodon’s guitarist, Bill Kelliher, recently gave an interview on the music podcast “Let There Be Talk,” where he explained how streaming services are killing music as we know it.  And potentially putting promising bands out of business.

Kelliher puts a lot of blame on popular music streaming services such as Apple Music and Spotify, who pay artists way too little money.  In Kelliher’s estimation, if this doesn’t change, a number of ‘successful’ artists and bands will have to leave the business.

Perhaps most shockingly, Kelliher further says that bands like his can no longer afford to make records.

Read the post by Marsha Silva on Digital Music News

Are Data Centers The New Cornhusker Kickback and the Facebook Fakeout?

In case you were scratching your head about why Nebraska Senator Ben Sasse decided to stick his beak into trying to continue discrimination against recording artists who had the misfortune to record before 1972–here’s a possible explanation.  Maybe he was just getting his beak wet?

Remember, Senator Sasse introduced an amendment to the Music Modernization Act in the dead of night the day before the markup of MMA in the Senate Judiciary Committee.  While Senator Ron Wyden–another data center beneficiary of Amazon, Facebook and Google–was at least trying to dress up his complicity in a Chanel suit and Louboutin shoes.  Senator Sasse went the more direct route:

Sasse Amendement

Now why might he be so interested, particuarly given Nebraska’s musical history?  It turns out that there is quite the competition between Nebraska and Iowa for Silicon Valley’s data center business, particularly given the rewewable energy profile of each state (wind is 37% of Iowa’s electricity production and about 20% of Nebraska (including hydro).  That checks the box for Silicon Valley.

Of course, as we see from Senator Sasse’s tone deaf foray into copyright lobbying, Silicon Valley thinks they can play the rubes in return for building data centers in their state, just like they did with Senator Ron Wyden and the people of Oregon.  What does stiffing pre-72 artists have to do with data centers?  Nothing.  What does it have to do with playing footsie with royalty deadbeats like Google and Facebook?

Everything.

And rumor has it that there is a deal in the wings for a new Google data center in Nebraska.  Which also explains a lot.

But somehow, Facebook knows that its Silicon Valleyness may not be that popular with the rubes.

According to Data Center Dynamics, Facebook has been going to great lengths to hide its involvement in massive data centers being built in Nebraska, which gives “Cornhusker Kickback” a whole new meaning:

Operating under the alias Raven Northbrook, Facebook has its eyes on Nebraska, DCDcan exclusively reveal

Late last year, local council officials granted approval for a large data center project in Sarpy County, Nebraska, but the company behind the huge facility was kept a secret.

Now, DCD can confirm that the corporation hoping to build four 610,000 square foot (56,670 sq m) data center halls at the Sarpy Power Park is Facebook.

You can run servers, but you cannot hide them

SHOW FULLSCREEN

Raven Northbrook, certificate of authority, Facebook

Source: Nebraska Secretary of State

Sarpy County documents reveal that the company, which is publicly represented by infrastructure engineering and design solutions company Olsson Associates, goes by the name Raven Northbrook.

Read the post on Data Center Dynamics

@hkonnath: ‘We want to move fast’: Facebook’s new data center near Papillion should be online by 2020

[Now we begin to understand why Senator Ben Sasse is carrying the MIC Coalition and the Internet Association’s water on fixing the pre-72 loophole in the Music Modernization Act.  Maybe Michael Beckerman promised to take him shoe shopping?  Is this the New Cornhusker Kickback?

As state and city leaders shared congratulatory handshakes and posed for photos with shiny blue Facebook shovels Tuesday morning, construction was already beginning on the social media giant’s new data center south of Papillion.

“We want to move fast,” said Tom Furlong, vice president of infrastructure for Facebook.

Timing is key for Facebook when it comes to site selection, Furlong said after the announcement at Papillion’s City Hall. He was joined by Gov. Pete Ricketts, Papillion Mayor David Black and other state and county leaders, who took turns standing in front of a backdrop featuring Facebook’s logo intermingled with the Greater Omaha Chamber’s “We Don’t Coast” slogan.

Nebraska leaders say the deal was years in the making.

This is some funny shit. The below article apparently triggered the threat of defamation lawsuit. Is Google Running Hybrid Information Warfare Attack on EU Parliament? Obviously we’re getting close. Yes I know this is bullshit. (Google wouldn’t warn me) But clearly we’ve struck a nerve with someone close to Google and/or proxy groups. Be a […]

via YOU’VE GOT THREATS! Therefore We Must be on to Something — The Trichordist

Must Read: @RobertBLevine_: What a Google Email to News Publications Means for the Music Business

The battle over the proposed European Union Copyright Directive is heating up — and technology companies have returned to their usual playbook. That means mobilizing nonprofit groups and academics they support, warning that policies will “break the internet,” and trying to get some creators and media companies on their side.

The latest example: An email from Google to news publications in its Digital News Initiative, a program the company established to help journalism online, asking them to lobby against parts of the Copyright Directive that are intended to help them. The email, from Google director of strategic relations Madhav Chinnappa, argues that giving publications an ancillary right to articles that they need to license content and requiring platforms to takes some responsibility to minimize the amount of copyrighted material uploaded by users would harm publications, as well as the internet. The email, obtained by Billboard, urges recipients to contact members of European Parliament to prevent the directive from passing parliament’s legal affairs committee with these provisions intact — which happened last week.

In layman’s terms, Google is asking a group of partners who have come to depend on its largesse to take action that will make them even more dependent.

Read the post on Billboard