@musictechpolicy: @RepJerryNadler steps up again on artist pay for radio play!

 

Representatives Jerry Nadler, John Conyers, Marsha Blackburn, Ted Deutch and Tom Rooney have reintroduced the Fair Play, Fair Pay bill to pay artists for radio airplay.

As MTP readers will recall, Representative Jerry Nadler has been a true voice for artist rights in Congress, particularly on artist pay for radio play. He was an early fan of the #irespectmusic campaign and took time to speak at the first #irespectmusic show at the Bitter End in New York.

via @RepJerryNadler steps up again on artist pay for radio play! — MUSIC • TECHNOLOGY • POLICY

@claireatki: Google’s ‘Hate’ Video Crisis Could Become a $1 Billion Problem

This week, Brian Wieser of Pivotal Research was the first analyst to downgrade Google because of the dustup.

It began last week when marketing giant Havas pulled all of its ads from Google’s YouTube UK site following a report from the Times of London that British government ads had been placed alongside videos from white supremacist David Duke and anti-Semitic pastor Steve Anderson.

Wieser told The Post on Wednesday that the impact will be felt by Google, which instead of discussing how to take away TV ad dollars in upcoming ad negotiations will now be mired in “brand safety issues.”

“The marginal increase [in ad dollars] is less likely to occur,” Wieser said.

He said the impact on Google was likely to be around 1 percent of its revenue base, or $1 billion.

“Google’s stated solution was late and woeful,” Wieser said. “Given numerous opportunities to nip it in the bud, they’ve seemingly made it worse.”

Read the post on The New York Post

@ap: Royalty Deadbeat Vimeo and The Man 2.0 Screw pre-72 Artists Again With the Fake “DMCA License”

Using forks and knives to eat their bacon

Piggies, written by George Harrison

The well-known royalty deadbeat Vimeo is screwing artists over yet again.  This time it’s pre-72 artists whose recordings the deadbeat wants to exploit on a “DMCA license” when the same courts deny justice to those very artists for the performance of their recordings by these very deadbeats.

Remember, the loophole these deadbeats exploit is the lack of federal copyright protection for sound recordings made prior to February 15, 1972, a totally arbitrary date.  In 1998 the Congress passed the horrendous DMCA safe harbor that The Man 2.0 lobbied for to allow them to claim they have no knowledge that they are infringing–despite the fact that their entire business is built on stealing other people’s music.

At the same time, the Congress finished up the work it started in 1995 to establish a full-blown royalty system for the performance of sound recordings, paying hundreds of millions to recording artist who were previously ripped off.  But–seizing an opportunity to save 30 pieces of silver, Sirius and Pandora fought to keep from paying pre-72 artists because The Turtles sued.  While nobody ever thought Sirius cared about anything but money, this is why Pandora’s  pro-artist bullshit is bullshit, leading to the musical question, how do you sleep at night?

So are you catching the theme here?  The courts protect Big Tech in both cases.  First, by allowing them safe harbor protection under the “DMCA license” according to the Supreme Court.  Is it any accident that Lessig pal Justice Elena Kagan is on the court?

Second, by protecting them from paying on pre-72 recordings in New York where the Vimeo case was filed.

U.S. courts just want to crush the old guys and dead cats at every opportunity.

The Supreme Court won’t hear an appeal from record companies that want to pursue copyright infringement claims against music site Vimeo for hosting unauthorized recordings from the Beatles, Elvis Presley and other classic artists.

The justices on Monday left in place a federal appeals court ruling that said websites are protected from liability even for older music recorded before 1972.

Read the post on Billboard

@tpoletti: Google’s YouTube ad controversy should scare investors

When is an “ad credit” actually a refund?  As Chris wrote on MusicTech.Solutions, Google advertisers should be entitled to refunds stretching back years for Google’s failure to live up to its promises to protect advertisers from their ads appearing in terror videos.

Many Wall Street analysts are trying to play down the continuing advertising controversy at Google’s YouTube, but Alphabet Inc. investors are likely jittery — and should be.

Last week, Google updated its ad policies and expanded safeguards for advertisersafter some pulled advertising from YouTube because the video streaming site was displaying ads next  to inappropriate content that espoused hate or even terrorism. Google said in a blog post that it has put in place more controls for advertisers, and it is also taking a tougher stance on hateful, offensive and derogatory content….

The bigger fear for investors is that an advertiser backlash could spread from YouTube to Google’s overall search business, or cast a pall over YouTube’s planned “skinny bundle” service. Since the story broke, Alphabet shares have fallen nearly 4%.

Google’s efforts to handle the situation are getting mixed reviews from investors who see cause for concern.

“Their public statements do not suggest to us that the company appreciates the degree to which advertisers are concerned and the continuing announcements of advertisers suspending their activity on Google properties reinforces our view,” Pivotal analyst Wieser wrote.

Trip Chowdhry, an analyst with Global Equities Research, predicted that Google will need to give out ad credits to lure back advertisers, which would also impact YouTube revenue.

Read the post on MarketWatch

@musictechpolicy: It Could Get Worse: UK Solicitor General Tells Google Don’t Be Criminal

According to multiple sources including the London Times, the UK’s Solicitor General floated the possibility that Google executives may face criminal prosecution for revenue share agreements with terrorist supporters posting videos on YouTube that Google monetized with advertising.  So not only would Google be in breach of its promises to advertisers, Google might also have breached the UK’s terror laws, money laundering statutes, or committed the usual list of lesser and included crimes.

Google could be prosecuted under anti-terrorism legislation if it fails to remove illegal content from its YouTube video platform, ministers said yesterday.

Robert Buckland, QC, the solicitor general, said that the internet giant could be criminally liable if it was found to have “recklessly” disseminated videos posted by extreme groups such as National Action, a far-right group proscribed as a terrorist organisation in December.

Mr Buckland also revealed that the government was considering adopting a German law which would allow huge fines to be levied on social media companies that failed to crack down on hate speech and illegal content.

Before you either snicker or drool at the idea of Google executives being frog marched out of their palatial offices in handcuffs and leg irons, remember a few of the examples of corporate crooks and just how long it took to actually get them into the pokey.  But also remember this–if you had told a room full of MBAs in 1985 that in a few years time Drexel Bernham Lambert would be bankrupt and Michael Milken would be in prison, you would have been laughed out of the room.

Read the post on Music Tech Policy

 

ISIS “National Anthem” Lyrics Brought to You By Proud Sponsor @MountainDew — The Trichordist

Mountain Dew banner and video ad served up by one of the ad networks in the box in the lower right corner. According to The Guardian in the UK this is the “national anthem” of Islamic State. https://www.theguardian.com/music/2014/nov/09/nasheed-how-isis-got-its-anthem

via ISIS “National Anthem” Lyrics Brought to You By Proud Sponsor @MountainDew — The Trichordist

@andygensler: @ASCAP Elects Board of Directors, Including SONA’s @mlewey

Paul Williams, ASCAP’s president and chairman of the board, has announced the 12 writer and 12 publisher members elected to serve on the PRO’s Board for a new two-year term that begins on April 1.

The most notable new member is songwriter/composer Michelle Lewis who has written songs for Cher and Little Mix and is a full-time composer for Disney. She is also director of the Songwriters of North America, an organization formed this past September and brought a lawsuit against the Department of Justice for its widely decried 100% licensing mandate.

Read the post on Billboard.