@jemaswad: Senators Introduce American Music Fairness Act, Which Would Require Radio to Pay Royalties to Musicians [thanks to Senators @MarshaBlackburn and @AlexPadilla4CA]

[Introducing AMFA in the Senate is a huge thing and a major win by MusicFirst over the evil NAB and their $50 handshake.]

Since the dawn of radio, the United States has been and remains the only major country in the world where terrestrial radio pays no royalties to performers or recorded-music copyright owners of the songs it plays — a situation that is largely due to the powerful radio lobby’s influence in Congress. While the more than 8,300 AM and FM stations across the country pay royalties to songwriters and publishers, they have never paid performers or copyright holders, although streaming services and satellite radio do.

On Thursday morning, Senators Alex Padilla (D-Calif.) and Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.) introduced the bipartisan American Music Fairness Act, which aims to rectify that situation by “ensur[ing] artists and music creators receive fair compensation for the use of their songs on AM/FM radio. This legislation will bring corporate radio broadcasters up-to-speed with all other music streaming platforms, which already pay artists for their music.”

Read the post on Variety

@sealeinthedeal Calls out Facebook/Meta Press Release on Their Own Wonderfulness

David Brooks and @knopps Give The Other Side of Dynamic Pricing: Big Tech Scalpers

What we don’t like about dynamic pricing is that it’s necessary because of free riding scalpers and the artists get blamed.

Bruce Springsteen fans had a rough introduction to the world of dynamic ticket pricing Wednesday (July 20), as many logged into Ticketmaster’s Verified Fan platform to buy tickets for his upcoming tour with the E Street Band and experienced sticker shock at the cost of the best seats.

Those prices – which climbed into the thousands of dollars, as widely reported – represented about 1 percent of the tickets listed on the Ticketmaster Verified Fan sale, but they became a sore point for fans who felt that they no longer had a shot at great seats after years of loyalty to the Boss.

By selling high-priced platinum tickets, Ticketmaster argues, the company can prevent the best seats from being bought and resold by scalpers. That money can instead go to Springsteen. However, this only works when the tickets cost enough to prevent scalpers from making a profit.

Sources tell Billboard that early numbers show that less than 10 percent of tickets sold for the five concerts that went on sale Wednesday ended up on the secondary market – lower than average – and that despite complaints about four-figure prices, only 1 percent of tickets were above $1,000.

Read the post on Billboard

@warnermusic Adopts SoundCloud’s Ground Breaking User Centric “Fan Powered Royalties” Model

We will continue to drill down on what this actually means, but it’s a huge step in the right direction. It’s another fairness making step by a major label along the path of recoupment improvements and most of all the frozen mechanical increase which was real money for all.

Also big thanks to SoundCloud for sticking to their beliefs and ignoring the critics and naysayers and, of course, the lobbyists.

It must be said that this development gives the lie to Spotify’s position that adopting user centric requires renegotiating every license in the known universe before the topic can be broached. Fortunately for the artists concerned, SoundCloud was willing–even lacking Spotify’s extra $300 million to satisfy Daniel Ek’s edifice complex in Barcelona–to invest the resources in constructing a user-centric royalty payment system in anticipation of widespread adoption.