Repost: The MTP Podcast: The Consequences of DOJ’s New Rule on 100% Licensing with David Lowery, Steve Winogradsky and Chris Castle

The Department of Justice–once again doing its best to crush small business–has appealed the BMI ruling (copy of DOJ appeal here).  Yes…she’s baaack….Remember DOJ Antitrust lawyer and ex-Googler Renata Hesse?  (aka “Defendant“)

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Hesse

Hesse’s reward for sticking the shiv into songwriters was a partnership with big bucks at the DC Office of Sullivan & Cromwell, aka the gold plated revolving door waiting room where she proudly lists her expertise in “Intellectual Property”.  She left out “Destroying Lives of People Who Can’t Fight Back”.

House-Bolton-heraldry

And then of course there’s shiv meister David C. Kully, his bad self, now a partner at Holland & Knight who did Hesse’s dirty work and really did the day to day on fufilling Hesse’s inexplicable obsession with screwing songwriters to the wall.  Kully encouraged songwriters to leave ASCAP if they didn’t like the DOJ’s ruling on 100% licensing.

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Why is this man smiling?

Originally posted on MUSIC • TECHNOLOGY • POLICY: David Lowery, Steve Winogradsky and Chris Castle discuss the implications of the new rule by the U.S. Department of Justice re-interpreting the ASCAP and BMI consent decrees to require 100% licensing and prohibiting partial withdrawal. David Lowery is the founder of Cracker and Camper van Beethoven, leading artist rights…

via The MTP Podcast: The Consequences of DOJ’s New Rule on 100% Licensing with David Lowery, Steve Winogradsky and Chris Castle — MUSIC • TECHNOLOGY • POLICY

 

@thetrichordist: If Only Artists and Managers Had Listened To Us : Spotify Per Stream Rates Keep Dropping

We hate to say we told ya so, but… Below is our post from September 2015. Two years ago we predicted the inevitable truth of the all you can eat Spotify subcription model. Like many of our predictionsand proposals (example; windowing titles) we’ve had to wait for the industry to catch up to us. Today, two years later, Digital Music News confirms our prediction.

Read the post on The Trichordist

@stuartdredge: @BASCA_UK @CrispinHunt “Rules Won’t Break the Internet, they’ll Mend It”

YouTube and Facebook were squarely in the sights of Crispin Hunt, chairman of the British Academy of Songwriters, Composers and Authors (BASCA), as he delivered the opening address at yesterday’s Ivor Novello Awards in London.

I want to thank YouTube and Facebook for cracking the funniest joke online: the one where they pretend they’re just a dumb pipe and not the biggest and best streaming services on the planet. You guys! You’re killing us… literally!” said Hunt.

However, he also praised three audio-streaming services for the role they’re playing in the music industry.

“On the other hand, I want to thank Apple and Spotify for teaching us how to sell music that isn’t trapped in plastic. And hopefully for saving the music industry in the process,” said Hunt.

“And let’s not forget Deezer for trying out a user-centric payment model, so that money from death-metal fans actually goes to death-metal bands, and not to Taylor Swift and Ed Sheeran. Ed and Taylor don’t need anybody else’s money, they’re quite brilliant enough. We should all join Deezer now!”

Read the post on MusicAlly

@cdnmusician: SoundExchange Acquires Canadian Musical Reproduction Rights Agency (CMRRA)

SoundExchange today announced that it has acquired the Canadian Musical Reproduction Rights Agency (CMRRA), the music licensing collective that represents the majority of songs recorded, sold, and broadcast in Canada on behalf of music publishers. The move is a dramatic development for the Canadian music industry and represents SoundExchange’s first expansion into the collective management of music publishing rights.

This transaction will allow the expanded organization to service an enormous cross section of Anglo-American sound recordings and music publishing repertoire. SoundExchange says the acquisition will provide it with a unique opportunity to offer a broad and comprehensive range of services to rights holders in both sound recordings and music publishing and music users alike across North America.

U.S.-based SoundExchange  collects and distributes digital performance royalties on behalf of more than 130,000 recording artists and master rights owners accounts and administers direct agreements on behalf of rights owners and licensees. To date, SoundExchange says it has paid out more than $4.5 billion in royalties.

The breakthrough transaction will mark the first time that a U.S. collective for sound recordings and the music publishing sector have come together under common management. Together the two agencies will integrate and streamline the administration and distribution of sound recording and music publishing royalties.

“We are proud to join forces with CMRRA. We have a simple, yet ambitious goal: to maximize the value of music for all creators – for musical works and recordings alike – wherever their work is used. The acquisition of CMRRA helps us increase efficiencies while also extending service to the publishing sector,” SoundExchange President and CEO Michael Huppe says. “This exciting partnership builds on CMRRA’s great relationships with music publishers and licensees, its long record of accomplishment, and its stellar reputation.”

CMRRA, founded in 1975, will continue to operate out of its Toronto headquarters.

SoundExchange and CMRRA will continue to work independently and serve their current customers while also exploring collaborative opportunities such as sharing core services.

CMRRA President Caroline Rioux and her senior management team will remain with the operation, reporting to the board of directors of SXWorks, a new subsidiary of SoundExchange. Huppe will lead SXWorks as chairman of the new company.

caroline-rioux-cmrra-picture
CMRRA President Caroline Rioux

Read the post on Canadian Musician

@musicbizworld: SoundExchange Moves Into Publishing Rights by Acquiring Canadian Body CMRRA

According to our sources, the Washington D.C-based organization has fully acquired mechanical rights collection agency the CMRRA (Canadian Musical Reproduction Rights Agency Ltd.).

The deal will bring together the management of a vast tranche of Anglo-American sound recordings and music publishing repertoire.

The two companies are expected to continue to be run separately, but with increased collaboration behind-the-scenes.

Read the post on Music Business Worldwide

@soundexchange: SoundExchange Acquires Canadian Musical Reproduction Rights Agency (CMRRA) [PRESS RELEASE]

This transaction will allow the expanded organization to service an enormous cross section of Anglo-American sound recordings and music publishing repertoire. The acquisition will provide SoundExchange a unique opportunity to offer a broad and comprehensive range of services to rights holders in both sound recordings and music publishing and music users alike across North America.

The breakthrough transaction will mark the first time that a U.S. collective for sound recordings and the music publishing sector have come together under common management. Together the two agencies will integrate and streamline the administration and distribution of sound recording and music publishing royalties.

“We are proud to join forces with CMRRA. We have a simple, yet ambitious goal: to maximize the value of music for all creators – for musical works and recordings alike – wherever their work is used. The acquisition of CMRRA helps us increase efficiencies while also extending service to the publishing sector,” SoundExchange President and Chief Executive Officer Michael Huppe said. “This exciting partnership builds on CMRRA’s great relationships with music publishers and licensees, its long record of accomplishment and its stellar reputation.”

CMRRA, founded in 1975, will continue to operate out of its Toronto headquarters.

SoundExchange and CMRRA will continue to work independently and serve their current customers while also exploring collaborative opportunities such as sharing core services.

CMRRA President Caroline Rioux and her senior management team will remain with the operation, reporting to the board of directors of SXWorks, a new subsidiary of SoundExchange. Huppe will lead SXWorks as Chairman of the new company.

“The board initiated its search for a strategic partner for CMRRA nearly a year ago,” said Gary Furniss, chair of the current CMRRA Board of Directors and president of Sony/ATV Music Publishing Canada. “The board was committed to finding a firm with the right mix of music industry know-how and a culture of digital entrepreneurship. SoundExchange fit the bill. Additionally, the opportunity for data collaboration will inevitably increase the speed, efficiency and accuracy of royalty payments for everyone.”

“We were looking for a partner that shares our vision and philosophy of service to the music publishing community,” Rioux said. “With SoundExchange, we will not only continue to deliver on our mission to maximize the value of the reproduction right in Canada and meet our clients’ needs to quality and low service fees, we will also be able to develop new services domestically and beyond.”

Importantly, SoundExchange and CMRRA each have proven expertise in their respective fields with a keen focus on digital music.

SoundExchange administers sound recording public performance rights for more than 3,000 digital radio services covered under U.S. statutory licenses and administers many royalties for direct agreements on behalf of rights owners and digital service providers. The company paid nearly $884 million in royalties to artists and rights owners in 2016. CMRRA represents the vast majority of musical works licensed in Canada and has assembled a large and comprehensive database that associates musical works to sound recordings. The agency provides services for numerous markets including streaming services, physical products, satellite and terrestrial broadcast mechanicals and more.

Details of the transaction are confidential.

For more information on the acquisition, click here.