Artist Rights Watch

News for the Artist Rights Advocacy Community

@andreworlowski: OK, Google? Probably not! EU settles on wording for copyright reform legislation

The EU has finally settled on the wording of its Digital Single Market copyright reform package, a three-years-in-the-making effort, greeting the agreement with a sizzling rebuke of the “misinformation campaigns” around the measures….

In a press conference today announcing the measures, MEP and Conservative legal affairs spokesman Sajjad Karim said the process had highlighted a disturbing development in the “political culture”.

“The ability of some of the platforms to carry out campaigns [against the legislation] is a good thing,” Karim said. “But the way some of these have been carried out really has been against the grain of how a democratic society should function.”

Individual staff members had been targeted, he said, by “elements that have misled the public about what we’re trying to achieve, and we’re sure will mislead the public as to what we have actually achieved. It strengthens our resolve to make sure we don’t allow European citizens to fall victim to that sort of misinformation.”

Read the post on The Register

@sammyandrews: Viewpoint: Sammy Andrews’ guide to influencer marketing

Let’s get the basics out of the way early. Influencer marketing is nothing new. Marilyn Monroe being gifted a dress to wear to a media event where she’ll be photographed? Influencer marketing. Every band you’ve ever seen wearing shoes they were gifted for free or paid to wear? Influencer marketing.

The difference now is who the real influencers are… You may be surprised to hear they’re mostly people you have never heard of, that have built trusted online relationships with thousands (or even millions) of people across social networks. They have more influence over what sells or gets into the cultural zeitgeist than just about any TV advert you can name.

In the digital world, it started with bloggers, which evolved into vloggers and then smartphones and social networks combined with advertising and got clever. Now there are thousands of hugely influential people online, globally, every hour of every day.

Read the post on MusicWeek

Press Release: House Judiciary Announces New Committee Members

House Judiciary Leaders Announce Committee Roster

WASHINGTON – The House Judiciary Committee held its first full committee meeting to introduce new members, adopt committee rules, appoint subcommittee chairs and ranking members, and approve subcommittee assignments. Ranking Member Doug Collins (R-Ga.) and Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.) released the following statements after the Judiciary Committee’s first meeting of the 116th Congress:

“It’s a great pleasure to join Chairman Nadler in welcoming our colleagues to the House Judiciary Committee. The opportunities our committee has to serve Americans and strengthen our democratic institutions are almost limitless. Together, we’ve built a legacy of passionate debate and bipartisan success. I look forward to hearing from every lawmaker on this committee and to deepening our collaboration throughout this Congress,” said Collins.

“I’m proud to welcome all of our Members to the House Judiciary Committee this Congress. The Committee has remained one of the most active committees in the House through lively debates, bipartisan partnerships, and advancing critical legislation. I expect this to continue and look forward to hearing from my colleagues on both sides of the aisle as we prepare to take on some of the most pressing issues of our time. I have worked closely with Ranking Member Collins on many issues in the past and hope that we will find more common ground over the next two years,” said Nadler.

Democratic Members

  • Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.), Chair
  • Rep. Zoe Lofgren (D-Calif.)
  • Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-Texas)
  • Rep. Steve Cohen (D-Tenn.)
  • Rep. Hank Johnson (D-Ga.)
  • Rep. Ted Deutch (D-Fla.)
  • Rep. Karen Bass (D-Calif.)
  • Rep. Cedric Richmond (D-La.)
  • Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (D-N.Y.)
  • Rep. David Cicilline (D-R.I.)
  • Rep. Eric Swalwell (D-Calif.)
  • Rep. Ted Lieu (D-Calif.)
  • Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-Md.)
  • Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-Wash.)
  • Rep. Val Demings (D-Fla.)
  • Rep. Lou Correa (D-Calif.)
  • Rep. Mary Gay Scanlon (D-Pa.), Vice Chair
  • Rep. Sylvia Garcia (D-Texas)
  • Rep. Joe Neguse (D-Colo.)
  • Rep. Lucy McBath (D-Ga.)
  • Rep. Greg Stanton (D-Ariz.)
  • Rep. Madeleine Dean (D-Pa.)
  • Rep. Debbie Mucarsel-Powell (D-Fla.)
  • Rep. Veronica Escobar (D-Texas)
Republican Members

  • Rep. Doug Collins (R-Ga.), Ranking Member
  • Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner (R-Wis.)
  • Rep. Steve Chabot (R-Ohio)
  • Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-Texas)
  • Rep. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio)
  • Rep. Ken Buck (R-Colo.)
  • Rep. John Ratcliffe (R-Texas)
  • Rep. Martha Roby (R-Ala.)
  • Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.)
  • Rep. Mike Johnson (R-La.)
  • Rep. Andy Biggs (R-Ariz.)
  • Rep. Tom McClintock (R-Calif.)
  • Rep. Debbie Lesko (R-Ariz.)
  • Rep. Guy Reschenthaler (R-Pa.)
  • Rep. Ben Cline (R-Va.)
  • Rep. Kelly Armstrong (R-N.D.)
  • Rep. Greg Steube (R-Fla.)
Committee on the Judiciary Subcommittee Assignments:

Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law

Democrats

  • Rep. Cicilline, Chair
  • Rep. Johnson
  • Rep. Raskin
  • Rep. Jayapal
  • Rep. Demings
  • Rep. Scanlon
  • Rep. Neguse, Vice Chair
  • Rep. McBath
Republicans

  • Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner, Ranking Member
  • Rep. Gaetz
  • Rep. Buck
  • Rep. Armstrong
  • Rep. Steube
Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights and Civil Liberties
Democrats

  • Rep. Cohen, Chair
  • Rep. Raskin, Vice Chair
  • Rep. Swalwell
  • Rep. Scanlon
  • Rep. Dean
  • Rep. Garcia
  • Rep. Escobar
  • Rep. Jackson Lee
Republicans

  • Rep. Johnson, Ranking Member
  • Rep. Gohmert
  • Rep. Jordan
  • Rep. Reschenthaler
  • Rep. Cline
  • Rep. Armstrong

Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property and the Internet
Democrats

  • Rep. Johnson, Chair
  • Rep. Deutch
  • Rep. Richmond
  • Rep. Jeffries
  • Rep. Lieu
  • Rep. Stanton
  • Rep. Lofgren
  • Rep. Cohen
  • Rep. Bass
  • Rep. Swalwell
  • Rep. Correa, Vice Chair
Republicans

  • Rep. Roby, Ranking Member
  • Rep. Chabot
  • Rep. Jordan
  • Rep. Ratcliffe
  • Rep. Gaetz
  • Rep. Johnson
  • Rep. Biggs
  • Rep. Reschenthaler
  • Rep. Cline
Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism and Homeland Security
Democrats

  • Rep. Bass, Chair
  • Rep. Jackson Lee
  • Rep. Demings, Vice Chair
  • Rep. McBath
  • Rep. Deutch
  • Rep. Richmond
  • Rep. Jeffries
  • Rep. Cicilline
  • Rep. Lieu
  • Rep. Dean
  • Rep. Mucarsel-Powell
  • Rep. Cohen
Republicans

  • Rep. Ratcliffe, Ranking Member
  • Rep. Sensenbrenner
  • Rep. Chabot
  • Rep. Gohmert
  • Rep. McClintock
  • Rep. Lesko
  • Rep. Reschenthaler
  • Rep. Cline
  • Rep. Steube
Subcommittee on Immigration and Citizenship
Democrats

  • Rep. Lofgren, Chair
  • Rep. Jayapal, Vice Chair
  • Rep. Correa
  • Rep. Garcia
  • Rep. Neguse
  • Rep. Mucarsel-Powell
  • Rep. Escobar
  • Rep. Jackson Lee
  • Rep. Scanlon
Republicans

  • Rep. Buck, Ranking Member
  • Rep. Biggs
  • Rep. McClintock
  • Rep. Lesko
  • Rep. Armstrong
  • Rep. Steube

@musictechpolicy: The MTP Podcast: Why Artists Should Care About Data Center Lobbying

Show Notes

Today’s podcast is about the impact on climate of the massive data centers operated in states outside of California and New York by Google, Facebook, Amazon and others.  I focus on Oregon and Nebraska, but there are many other locations.  These massive building projects enable Google to exercise its lobbying muscle in states you wouldn’t expect and on the federal senators and representatives of those states on issues familiar with our old adversary:  Artist rights, profit from human trafficking, drugs and brand sponsored piracy.

Are Data Centers The New Cornhusker Kickback and the Facebook Fakeout?

The Mother’s Milk of Algorithms: Google Expands Its Data Center Lobbying Footprint in Minnesota–Home to Senator Amy Klobuchar

What’s Up With @SenSasse’s Vicious Little Amendment on pre-72?

Here Comes the Shiv: Sen. Sasse to Move to Strike the CLASSICS Act and Screw Pre-72 Artists

Carbon Clouds: Should Artists Ask Why Aren’t Google, Amazon and Facebook in the Green New Deal?

Greenpeace “Dirty Data” research. www.greenpeace.org/archive-interna…-greenpeace.pdf

Nature magazine sums it up (www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-06610-y):

“Upload your latest holiday photos to Facebook, and there’s a chance they’ll end up stored in Prineville, Oregon, a small town where the firm has built three giant data centres and is planning two more. [Hello, Senator Wyden.] Inside these vast factories, bigger than aircraft carriers, tens of thousands of circuit boards are racked row upon row, stretching down windowless halls so long that staff ride through the corridors on scooters.

These huge buildings are the treasuries of the new industrial kings: the information traders. The five biggest global companies by market capitalization this year are currently Apple, Amazon, Alphabet, Microsoft and Facebook, replacing titans such as Shell and ExxonMobil. Although information factories might not spew out black smoke or grind greasy cogs, they are not bereft of environmental impact. As demand for Internet and mobile-phone traffic skyrockets, the information industry could lead to an explosion in energy use.”

According to the National Resources Defense Council www.nrdc.org/resources/americas…ing-amounts-energy:

“Data centers are the backbone of the modern economy — from the server rooms that power small- to medium-sized organizations to the enterprise data centers that support American corporations and the server farms that run cloud computing services hosted by Amazon, Facebook, Google, and others. However, the explosion of digital content, big data, e-commerce, and Internet traffic is also making data centers one of the fastest-growing consumers of electricity in developed countries, and one of the key drivers in the construction of new power plants.

Google emits less than 8 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per day to serve an active Google user—defined as someone who performs 25 searches and watches 60 minutes of YouTube a day, has a Gmail account, and uses our other key services.”

In Google-speak “less than 8” usually means 7.9999999999. So let’s call it 8. As of 2016 there were 1 billion active gmail users. So rough justice, Google acknowledges that it emits about 8 billion grams of carbon dioxide daily, or 9,000 tons. And based on the characteristically tricky way Google framed the measurement, that doesn’t count the users who don’t have a gmail account, don’t use “our other key services” and may watch more than an hour a day of YouTube.Upload today,

@nickconfessore @laforgia_ gabriel-j-x-dance: Facebook offered users privacy wall, then let Spotify and other tech giants around it

For years, Facebook gave some of the world’s largest technology companies more intrusive access to users’ personal data than it has disclosed, effectively exempting those business partners from its usual privacy rules, according to internal records and interviews.

The special arrangements are detailed in hundreds of pages of Facebook documents obtained by The New York Times. The records, generated in 2017 by the company’s internal system for tracking partnerships, provide the most complete picture yet of the social network’s data-sharing practices. They also underscore how personal data has become the most prized commodity of the digital age, traded on a vast scale by some of the most powerful companies in Silicon Valley and beyond.

The exchange was intended to benefit everyone. Pushing for explosive growth, Facebook got more users, lifting its advertising revenue. Partner companies acquired features to make their products more attractive. Facebook users connected with friends across different devices and websites. But Facebook also assumed extraordinary power over the personal information of its 2.2 billion users — control it has wielded with little transparency or outside oversight.

The social network allowed Microsoft’s Bing search engine to see the names of virtually all Facebook users’ friends without consent, the records show, and gave Netflix and Spotify the ability to read Facebook users’ private messages.

Read the post on the New York Times.

@RichardJamesBurgess: It’s Long Past Time for Big Radio to Pay Artists, Producers and Labels #irespectmusic

In a situation unique to the United States among the world’s major countries, terrestrial radio stations have never paid royalties to record labels, artists and producers, although they do to songwriters and music publishers. A2IM CEO Richard James Burgess, formerly a music producer and head of Smithsonian Folkways Records, weighs in on that situation.

Read the post on Variety