@davidmross: @mikehuppe: Standing Up For The Value Of Music

[Editor Charlie sez: Insightful must-read artist rights interview with Mike Huppe, the CEO of SoundExchange.]

During the following interview, held at the Omni Hotel in Nashville, we covered a variety of topics such as what Huppe calls the AM/FM Artist Loophole, the DMCA Safe “Ocean,” internet enabled auto dashboards and the organization’s new ISRC online searchable database. Read On…

NEKST: Do you expect SoundExchange’s distribution growth will continue?
Mike Huppe: We’ve had unbelievable double digit growth for the past 7 or 8 years which won’t continue forever, but we are on track to have another up year in 2016. We paid out about $803 million last year and should be in the mid-$800s this year. It will naturally level out as we get bigger and the market matures.

Read the post on Nekst.biz

@songfreedom: Stop Blaming the Victims of Facebook’s Blatant Copyright Theft: Ari Herstand: you’re dead wrong about Facebook

After reading Ari Herstand’s tirade against Universal Music Publishing Group (and other rights owners by association) several thoughts came to mind.  In fact, many of those same thoughts have been voiced by several others in the comment threads following that article.

While Ari is typically a great advocate for artists, he has this one wrong and just plain backwards.

Read the post on Digital Music News.

Google and Amazon Leverage Copyright Loophole to Use Songs Without Paying Songwriters

Two vastly wealthy multinational media companies are exploiting a copyright law loophole to sell the world’s music without paying royalties to the world’s songwriters. Why? Because Google and Amazon–purveyors of Big Data–claim they “can’t” find contact information for song owners in a Google search. So these two companies are exploiting songs without paying royalties by […]

via Google and Amazon Leverage Copyright Loophole to Use Songs Without Paying Songwriters — MUSIC • TECHNOLOGY • POLICY

@lmoses: Not just Facebook: Advertisers have measurement gripes with all platforms

Facebook’s inflate-gate put a spotlight on the problem with a platform being a walled garden. But while Facebook may get more attention because of its size, other platforms also have their measurement issues. While Facebook’s overcounting of its video viewing was “a massive error,” said Benjamin Arnold, business director at We Are Social, “the other platforms are still behind in advertising offerings and integrations.”

Until they catch up, the holy grail of having one yardstick that lets marketers measure how their ads are performing from one platform to another is far off. Here’s a platform-by-platform assessment:

Read the post on Digiday

@claireatki: Facebook tests ‘music’ videos to keep eyeballs from YouTube

But Facebook is unlicensed and uses the “compulsory DMCA license”….

Within the past few weeks, the social network has quietly initiated talks with music labels about licensing a limited amount of songs that users can upload to, say, summer vacation videos or birthday parties, sources said.

The idea, if it comes to fruition, would be a way to keep music labels happy at a time when they’re frustrated about the volume of unlicensed user-generated content at YouTube.

Facebook late Sunday confirmed it was testing a new product, called Slideshow, that includes music from Warner Music Group to help users create “soundtrack options.”

“We are always testing ways to help people better share their stories with friends,” a spokesperson for the Menlo Park company said in a statement. “Slideshows are a new way for people to share photos and videos in a creative and succinct way. To date, we’ve been using Facebook-owned music to accompany these slideshows, we will now be testing the use of a limited amount of music from Warner Music Group as soundtrack options.”

Facebook’s music offensive, aimed at keeping user-generated content inside its walls, emerges just days after Jeff Bezos’ Amazon announced it would launch Prime Video Service as a new hub for amateur and professional videos of all kinds.

To be sure, Facebook’s efforts in the music space have been limited — and YouTube’s head start and entrenched leadership position put in question just how many eyeballs any rival can steal away from the mega-popular video-streaming brand.

While Facebook once held talks about a possible acquisition of music industry-owned Vevo, it hasn’t made great strides in the revenue-rich video arena.

Read more on NY Post.