@nate_taplin: New Age of Chinese Nationalism Threatens Supply Chains

Relations between China and the West are off to a rocky start in 2021. Observers watching China and the U.S. trade accusations in Alaska, and Europe and China trade sanctions days later can be forgiven for a cold feeling in the pit of their stomach. Beijing’s tolerance for economic risk in the service of nationalism has rarely looked higher.

That could bode ill for many, not least Taiwan and the littoral states of the South China Sea. The trade conflict between the U.S. and China has metastasized into a broader geopolitical confrontation—while China’s armed forces are nearing parity with the U.S. in the former’s backyard. Chinese incursions into Taiwan’s air defense identification zone have at times become a near daily occurrence since late 2020, while the U.S. is busy rallying allies such as Japan to plan for contingencies.

A significant conflict between the U.S. and China in East Asia is still unlikely, but it can no longer be ruled out as an implausible tail risk. Companies need to start considering what that could mean. And governments need to find mutually acceptable ways to take the temperature down if they want regular business to remain possible.

Read the post on the Wall Street Journal

@bbcnews: Hong Kong pro-democracy tycoon Jimmy Lai denied bail under security law

[Editor Charlie sez: The publisher Jimmy Lai is being prosecuted by the Chinese Communist Party under the same National Security Law that covers TikTok employees.]

Hong Kong media tycoon Jimmy Lai has been denied bail while awaiting trial under a controversial new national security law. 

Mr Lai, 73, is accused of conspiring with foreign forces to endanger national security, and could face a lengthy jail term.

He is the most high-profile person charged under the law.

Mr Lai founded the Apple Daily newspaper and is a fierce critic of the authorities in mainland China.

The tycoon was originally arrested under the law in August 2020 after a police raid on Apple Daily’s head office. He was released on bail but then rearrested in December.

Read the post on BBC News

@bbc Hong Kong lawmakers barred by Beijing from office

Beijing has made an unprecedented intervention in Hong Kong politics to block two lawmakers from taking office.

Pro-independence elected lawmakers Sixtus Leung and Yau Wai-ching have refused to pledge allegiance to Beijing when being sworn in.

Beijing has now interpreted a section of Hong Kong law to mean any official who does not swear the oath properly cannot take office, said state media.

The move comes after weeks of chaos in the Hong Kong legislature.

There were also protests, and some scuffles, in Hong Kong on Sunday night, with at least four arrests.

Hong Kong’s Chief Executive CY Leung said his government would “fully implement” the ruling.

Read the post on BBC.