@hypebot: How To Contact The Court If PledgeMusic Owes You Money plus Confirmation That An Investigation Is Underway

Attorney and artist advocate Chris Castle received a confirmation via tweet that the Official Receiver was also tasked with determining “the cause of its failure.” Further, “if unacceptable conduct is identified she can seek to have the directors banned from running other companies for up to 15 years.” That’s not exactly the punishment that those affected had hoped for it wrongdoing is proven but also does not rule out further legal or government action against the PledgeMusic board and executives.

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@stuartdredge: PledgeMusic founder responds to criticism over liquidation

PledgeMusic founder Benji Rogers has responded to criticism of the crowdfunding company’s liquidation this week in London. That criticism was based on the fact that Pledge had filed papers for its wind-up hearing in June, at a point when artists were being led to believe a sale might still be possible for the company….

Meanwhile, people are digging back into PledgeMusic’s past financial results – this blog post on music blog My Emu is Emo for example – to explore how and when it all started to go wrong.

Read the post on MusicAlly

@cmu: Official Receiver provides updates on PledgeMusic liquidation

US websites Music Technology Policy and The Trichordist both tweeted the Official Receiver. The former pointed out that artists in multiple countries have likely been affected by the collapse of Pledge, many of whom won’t be able to make physical representations in the UK. The latter asked whether affected artists should be approaching the Crown Prosecution Service as well as the Official Receiver demanding some kind of criminal investigation.

Confirming its process and powers, the Official Receiver tweeted back: “Following the winding up of PledgeMusic, the Official Receiver has been appointed as liquidator and will now determine the cause of its failure. If unacceptable conduct is identified she can seek to have the directors banned from running other companies for up to fifteen years”.

Read the post on Complete Music Update

Helen Smith: OPINION: Think Copyright Law Changes In Europe Won’t Affect You? Definitely Think Again

Copyright reform to boost the digital music market – what’s next?

Few could have missed hearing about the copyright debate in Europe. Amid cries of “upload filters”, “censorship machine”, “robocopyright” and other buzzwords, the move to bring copyright up to date came under heavy fire. The battle raged for nearly three years. The final directive was published in May. It’s an impressive result for the music sector in particular.

The legislation marks a turning point for copyright rules in Europe and beyond. All eyes are now on EU member states as they start implementing the directive into their national laws. Of course, this will bring its own share of challenges. We know the lengths some parties will go to try and hold on to the status quo.

So what was all the fuss about? It started when the EU decided it was time to clarify what the courts had already been saying about platforms. They provide access to music and other copyright material uploaded by citizens, so they need a licence and can’t rely on safe harbour legislation.

As you can imagine, this wasn’t music to everyone’s ears.

Read the post on The Music

@kellymakena: New bill would ban autoplay videos and endless scrolling

Snapstreaks, YouTube autoplay, and endless scrolling are all coming under fire from a new bill, which is sponsored by Sen. Josh Hawley (R-MO), targeting the tech industry’s “addictive” design.

Hawley’s Social Media Addiction Reduction Technology Act, or the SMART Act, would ban these features that work to keep users on platforms longer, along with others, like Snapstreaks, that incentivize the continued use of these products. If approved, the Federal Trade Commission and Health and Human Services could create similar rules that would expire after three years unless Congress codified them into law.

“Big tech has embraced a business model of addiction,” Hawley said. “Too much of the ‘innovation’ in this space is designed not to create better products, but to capture more attention by using psychological tricks that make it difficult to look away.”

Read the post on The Verge

[Editor Charlie sez:  Remember “Nicotine is not Addictive” Senator Wyden?  Here’s your chance to reprise your role in the consumer protection movie.]

Wyden Tobacco

 

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