@mikehuppe: Broadcast Radio Makes an Ironic Plea for Fairness

SoundExchange’s CEO says it’s time radio starts paying all music creators fairly for their work.

On Monday, a group of radio broadcasters penned a letter in support of the National Association of Broadcasters’ (NAB) push for deregulation of the $14 billion radio industry. Their letter was based on the NAB’s petition to the FCC this past June, in which the NAB sought to allow expanded broadcaster ownership of radio stations (i.e., increased consolidation) throughout the country. The NAB’s justification: broadcasters must adjust their business model to the realities of the new streaming world.

As a representative of the many creative parties who help craft music, we are frequently on the opposite side of issues from the NAB. And while I can’t comment on NAB’s specific requests, I was delighted to find so much common ground in their FCC filing in June….

I agree with the NAB that the law should “finally adopt rules reflecting competitive reality in today’s audio marketplace” and should “level the playing field” for all entities in the music economy.

If radio truly wants to modernize, it can start by taking a giant leap into the 21st century and paying all music creators fairly for their work. Stop treating artists like 17th century indentured servants, just so radio can reap bigger profits. If radio wants to have rules that reflect the music industry of today, then that should apply across the board.

We should resolve this gaping unfairness to artists before we begin talking about allowing radio to consolidate even further.

 

Read the post on Billboard

 

@soundexchange: SXWorks Announces New Services for Music Publishers and Songwriters

PRESS RELEASE

 

JUNE 12, 2018

SXWorks Announces New Services for Music Publishers and Songwriters

NOI Premium Expands on NOI LOOKUP Tools

WASHINGTON, DC – June 12, 2018 – SXWorks, a subsidiary of SoundExchange, today announced that it has developed two new services to expand upon NOI LOOKUP, the innovative new tool launched in January to help music publishers and songwriters search the more than 70 million address unknown Notice of Intention to Use (NOI) filings made with the U.S. Copyright Office.

NOI Premium Services, available beginning today from SXWorks, will give publishers and songwriters more opportunities to claim unpaid mechanical royalties from digital service providers (DSPs) and facilitate communication for creators with DSPs and the Copyright Office.

“Development of NOI Premium Services is a direct result of interest in our NOI LOOKUP service and the demand for more services from the publishers who use NOI LOOKUP,” said Michael Huppe, Chairman of the Board of SXWorks. “Since the introduction of NOI LOOKUP, songwriters and publishers have asked us to advance our efforts to help them get paid fairly and accurately.”

The new NOI Premium Services unveiled today are Works Claiming and Recordation.

Works Claiming helps publishers submit ownership claims and works shares to a digital service provider (DSP) for its use of a musical work. NOI Premium Services customers upload their works claims to SXWorks. SXWorks then sorts, formats and aggregates the uploaded file and forwards the rights owner’s claim and information to the proper contact at the DSPs identified by the publisher that filed NOIs for the musical work in question. A flat fee of $100 covers the cost of submitting up to three Works Claiming spreadsheets during a one-year period, each with up to 500 titles listed.

Recordation services take the Works Claiming tool a step further. If a songwriter or publisher requests the Recordation service, SXWorks will facilitate submission of the proper information and documents to the Copyright Office so the Office’s records are current and DSPs can locate a publisher’s contact information and ownership data. The recordation fee is $75 per submission plus fees charged by the Copyright Office.

“These new services represent the next step in the evolution of NOI LOOKUP. We know that giving publishers more control by creating new tools will help us chip away at the problem surrounding NOIs and unpaid royalties,” Huppe said. “It’s also important to note that NOI LOOKUP and NOI Premium Services represent the latest innovation – following our International Standard Recording Code (ISRC) Search and our new Music Data Exchange (MDX) program launched last month – to help publishers and songwriters by bringing transparency and efficiency to the music industry.”

To learn more about the new Works Claiming and Recordation services, read our FAQs here.

About SXWorks
SXWorks provides global services to music publishers to support multiple licensing configurations. SXWorks, a subsidiary of SoundExchange, is governed by a board consisting of leading music publishers and SoundExchange executives. SXWorks was created in conjunction with the 2017 acquisition of the Canadian Musical Reproduction Rights Agency Ltd. (CMRRA). CMRRA represents the mechanical rights of music publishers and administers the majority of songs recorded, sold and broadcast in Canada.

@hypebot: SiriusXM To Pay SoundExchange $150 Million Settlement

SoundExchange and SiriusXM have settled their years-long litigation surrounding outstanding claims for unpaid and underpaid royalties from January 2007 through December 2017 in exchange for a lump sum payment of $150 million.

The preforming rights organization will distribute the settlement funds to the rights holders and artists whose sound recordings were used during the settlement period.

Read the post on Hypebot

@hypebot: @SoundExchange Launches Music Data Exchange To Connect Label, Publisher Metadata — Music Tech Solutions

SoundExchange’s new Music Data Exchange (MDX) is a promising idea that gets at the real problem with mass infringement of songs by digital services. It also gives some hope of actually reducing the “pending and unmatched” (or “black box” in the vernacular) at the source–before the songs are infringed.

via @hypebot: @SoundExchange Launches Music Data Exchange To Connect Label, Publisher Metadata — Music Tech Solutions

@MykiAngeline: @The_WIMN: Front And Center: @SoundExchange Senior Director Of Industry And Artist Relations, @LindaBlossBaum

[Editor Charlie sez:  Must read interview with a true artist rights advocate, Linda Bloss-Baum.]

Music has come a long way since the age of vinyl records and cassette tapes. It wasn’t that long ago when the only way to listen to music was either attending a live performance, tune in to your favorite radio station, or purchase hard copies from your local music store. Now with the ability to stream music from the internet, listening to our favorite artist is readily at our finger tips. Anyone with a laptop or smart phone can access almost any artist and song.

It also became increasingly harder for music artists to get paid for their creations.

This is where companies like SoundExchange come into play, working at the center of digital music to develop business solutions that benefit the entire music industry. As the Senior Director of Industry and Artist Relations, Linda Bloss-Buam ensure that artists and rights owners are aware of all the services that SoundExchange has to offer.

Below, Linda shares with us how she applies her experience and training in music policies and practices, and what she is doing to increase awareness of women in the music industry.

Read the interview on the Women’s International Music Network

 

@mikehuppe: As New Bill Drops To Protect Pre-1972 Copyrights, SoundExchange’s Michael Huppe Weighs In

New “CLASSICS” act is one of several before the 115th Congress seeking to fix laws hurting music creators

The music industry is on the road to recovery. Dramatic revenue declines, which plagued the business for more than a decade, have begun to turn around, driven by streaming and other digital formats. This development has been hard fought and is the result of a concerted multi-year industry effort to embrace new monetization opportunities. This road to recovery, however, is long and our journey is far from complete. Revenues are still significantly below the industry’s peak, and our public policy is far from where it should be.

In Washington, D.C., we have been working with the entire music industry, service providers and lawmakers on both sides of the aisle to reform public policy and fix antiquated laws that harm America’s music creators.

This effort is starting to bear fruit. Several bills have been introduced in the 115th Congress that seek to fix problems with the way our laws treat music creators. We hope that these bills are emblematic of a positive change in the policy environment. Each bill is a step along the way, fitting into a larger vision of reform to repair our laws’ historical mistreatment of music creators.

Read the post on Billboard

@soundexchange Victorious Over Muzak for Underpaying Royalties

[Editor Charlie sez:  This is why audits are important.]

Commenting on the ruling, SoundExchange President and CEO Michael Huppe said:

“On behalf of music creators, we are gratified by the D.C. Circuit’s ruling in our favor today. This important decision rejects Muzak’s effort to expand its limited grandfathered eligibility for below-market rates.  As the Court properly recognized, Muzak’s position ‘threatens the very purpose of the [Digital Millennium Copyright] Act.’ Looking ahead, the decision will help SoundExchange continue its efforts to ensure that recording artists and rights owners receive proper compensation when their creative work is used.”

Technical background on the case

The passage of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998 (DMCA) set forth under the law that most subscription services (e.g. those services that deliver music content to cable and satellite television providers) would have their statutory rates set by a fair market value standard (i.e. willing buyer, willing seller). When the DMCA was passed, a small handful of “pre-existing” services, including Muzak and their provision of music to Dish Network, were grandfathered into an outdated standard for setting royalty rates – a standard that frequently results in artists and labels being paid less than a fair rate.

In 2011, Muzak was purchased by Mood Media who, in turn, also purchased DMX, a Texas-based company that also provided music for cable and satellite television networks, including DirecTV. DMX had previously been licensing music under the regular fair market standard. In 2014, Mood Media moved DMX’s cable and satellite music service contracts (including DirecTV) to Muzak, thereby converting a large part of DMX’s former business into a faux “pre-existing” service and dramatically slashing what it paid for the use of the music it was providing.

Get a copy of the winning court ruling here.