Will Senator 230 Reprise His Nicotine Addiction Hearings for Internet Addiction?

Wyden Internet Addiction

“Senator 230,” as Senator Ron Wyden known in some circles, refers to the very controversial Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act that provided, among other things, a safe harbor for human trafficking thanks to Senator Wyden until he was resoundingly defeated on the Stop Enabling Sex Trafficking Act.

Senator 230 authored the original bill back in 1996 before we knew that the Internet would be run by a cabal of criminals and the soulless Silicon Valley privileged class engaged in the biggest income transfer of all time.

FOSTA

It’s worth realizing how low these people will go when you consider that their entire business is built on behavioral addiction to one degree or another.

Long-time followers of Senator Wyden’s career may remember him from the tobacco hearings when he was the Senator that got Big Tobacco to say that nicotine was not addictive.  This is a good example of how Senator 230 hides in plain sight.  He gets props for standing up for progressive causes in the sunlight, but what happens in the shadows?

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But we can be certain that he will not reprise those hearings to investigate Internet addiction–why?  Because he’s in the pocket of Big Tech.  Aside from the fact that Senator 230 is as close to Google as one is to two, we also know it’s not just Google.  Senator 230 also is beholden to a who’s who of Big Tech all of whom suck down Oregon’s hydroelectric power to run some of their massive data centers.

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We’ve always said that there is a “Pinto memo” out there somewhere at Facebook and Google and that Big Tech is going to get taken down by a Jeffrey Wigand-style whistleblower.  (See Grimshaw v. Ford Motor Co., 119 Cal.App.3d 757 (1981) and the Tobacco Master Settlement Agreement (1998).)

For example, Buzzfeed reports on a memo written by Facebook senior manager Andrew Bosworth:

“We connect people. Period. That’s why all the work we do in growth is justified. All the questionable contact importing practices. All the subtle language that helps people stay searchable by friends. All of the work we do to bring more communication in. The work we will likely have to do in China some day. All of it,” VP Andrew “Boz” Bosworth wrote.

“So we connect more people,” he wrote in another section of the memo. “That can be bad if they make it negative. Maybe it costs someone a life by exposing someone to bullies.

“Maybe someone dies in a terrorist attack coordinated on our tools.”

The downfall will be over the addiction issue which is, of course, directly tied to the data issue which is tied to the indifference issue.  The amoral indifference to “maybe someone dies in a terrorist attack coordinated on our tools.”  And no one has the street cred to hold hearings investigating Internet addiction than Senator 230 himself.

Yes, if Senator Wyden actually cared about treating Internet addiction, you would think he’d be interested in reprising his nicotine addiction hearings for Internet addiction.  Wouldn’t you love to see the FAANGS CEOs getting sworn in?

Wyden Alley

#OregonManBad: Senator @RonWyden is still #justone Senator sneaking around trying to screw creators in the shadows

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Oregon Senator Ron Wyden is still sneaking around in the shadows abusing the anti-democratic secret hold to stop the CASE Act from passing the U.S. Senate, the copyright small claims bill.  And get this–the CASE Act is bipartisan legislation that has been in the works for years and years and has already passed the U.S. House of Representatives and his own Senate Judiciary Committee!

But Senator Wyden is abusing a little known procedural trick to stop the bill from coming to a vote in the Senate so it can bring relief to independent creators in a vast number of copyright fields like photographers, authors, illustrators, songwriters and recording artists.  And it’s not like his constituents want him to oppose it, they want him to pass it!

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Oregon Professional Photographers Association Billboards

Little Ronnie doesn’t like the nasty billboards.  Do you think he thinks he can stomp his little foot and tell Senator Kennedy, Senator Durban and all his other colleagues to bark at the moon?  Who does this guy think he is?  Do you think he thinks he can get the billboards down if he holds his breath long enough?  Did he ever consider that maybe we’re just getting started bringing heat to his butt?

He’s clearly in the pocket of Big Tech and has been for a very long time.  This is a man who holds up every copyright bill that comes through the Congress and he does it the same way every time.

But this time he’s beginning to think he might actually get unelected because he underestimated the number of independent creators who are going after his job.

Say it like a mantra and share it with your friends–Oregon Man Bad!

 

The #CASEAct and Senator @RonWyden’s Google Connection

 

Even More Bad Faith From Ron Wyden on Copyright Small Claims Legislation musictechpolicy.com/2020/01/16/even…ms-legislation/

CASE Act Materials (Flow Chart, Explanation of Holds) artistrightswatchdotcom.files.wordpress.com/202…pdf

Senator Ben Sasse’s Data Center Influences–What’s Up With Senator Ben Sasse’s Vicious Little Amendment on Pre-72? musictechpolicy.com/2018/06/28/what…ment-on-pre-72/

Are Data Centers The New Cornhusker Kickback and the Facebook Fakeout? musictechpolicy.com/2018/07/09/are-…cebook-fakeout/

@ArtistRightsNow/Content Creators Coalition Open Letter to Senator @RonWyden on Passing the CLASSICS Act

September 17, 2018

Dear Senator Wyden,

Being a musician isn’t easy. We spend months on tour, play late night shows, and spend hours, even days, on end in the recording studio. We sacrifice time with our families and money that could be made in more lucrative, stable jobs. While certainly not an easy decision, we make these sacrifices freely, because this is what we love to do. We don’t ask for special treatment or undue assistance.

All we ask is that you have our back.

The CLASSICS Act, incorporated in the Music Modernization Act, gives elderly artists what they deserve – what they’ve earned. It’s an injustice that just because someone’s career began before 1972, they don’t earn money the same way that other artists do.

Aging artists who recorded music prior to the 1972 cutoff are suffering. They’ve worked decades, making the sacrifices that we all do, only to be robbed when it harms them the most. They’re not asking for a handout, just for the income they’ve earned.

The CLASSICS Act fixes this, eliminating the arbitrary 1972 cutoff. Not only does it make things fairer, it will help older artists in retirement who are struggling without regular income. Millions of seniors in the US live in poverty – we should be working to cut that number, not exacerbating the crisis.

The overall Music Modernization Act would benefit music creators of all ages across the country and provide certainty to digital services. That’s why an unprecedented coalition of songwriters and publishers, record labels and performers, and digital services has joined together to support the bill.

Oregon is home to thousands of musicians of all ages who are counting on you. Support us by supporting the CLASSICS Act as part of the Music Modernization Act.

Amber Sweeney | Bruce Fife | Carrie Brownstein | Corin Tucker

Janet Weiss  | Kathy Foster | k.d. lang | Laura Veirs

Maggie Vail | Neko Case | Peter Buck | Scott McCaughey

Sam Coomes | Scott Magee | Ural Thomas | Westin Glass

Are Data Centers The New Cornhusker Kickback and the Facebook Fakeout?

In case you were scratching your head about why Nebraska Senator Ben Sasse decided to stick his beak into trying to continue discrimination against recording artists who had the misfortune to record before 1972–here’s a possible explanation.  Maybe he was just getting his beak wet?

Remember, Senator Sasse introduced an amendment to the Music Modernization Act in the dead of night the day before the markup of MMA in the Senate Judiciary Committee.  While Senator Ron Wyden–another data center beneficiary of Amazon, Facebook and Google–was at least trying to dress up his complicity in a Chanel suit and Louboutin shoes.  Senator Sasse went the more direct route:

Sasse Amendement

Now why might he be so interested, particuarly given Nebraska’s musical history?  It turns out that there is quite the competition between Nebraska and Iowa for Silicon Valley’s data center business, particularly given the rewewable energy profile of each state (wind is 37% of Iowa’s electricity production and about 20% of Nebraska (including hydro).  That checks the box for Silicon Valley.

Of course, as we see from Senator Sasse’s tone deaf foray into copyright lobbying, Silicon Valley thinks they can play the rubes in return for building data centers in their state, just like they did with Senator Ron Wyden and the people of Oregon.  What does stiffing pre-72 artists have to do with data centers?  Nothing.  What does it have to do with playing footsie with royalty deadbeats like Google and Facebook?

Everything.

And rumor has it that there is a deal in the wings for a new Google data center in Nebraska.  Which also explains a lot.

But somehow, Facebook knows that its Silicon Valleyness may not be that popular with the rubes.

According to Data Center Dynamics, Facebook has been going to great lengths to hide its involvement in massive data centers being built in Nebraska, which gives “Cornhusker Kickback” a whole new meaning:

Operating under the alias Raven Northbrook, Facebook has its eyes on Nebraska, DCDcan exclusively reveal

Late last year, local council officials granted approval for a large data center project in Sarpy County, Nebraska, but the company behind the huge facility was kept a secret.

Now, DCD can confirm that the corporation hoping to build four 610,000 square foot (56,670 sq m) data center halls at the Sarpy Power Park is Facebook.

You can run servers, but you cannot hide them

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Raven Northbrook, certificate of authority, Facebook

Source: Nebraska Secretary of State

Sarpy County documents reveal that the company, which is publicly represented by infrastructure engineering and design solutions company Olsson Associates, goes by the name Raven Northbrook.

Read the post on Data Center Dynamics