@davidclowery: Like a Meth and Vodka Fueled Low Grade Stripper Google Doesn’t Give a Shit and Goes Hog Wild in Last Days of Obama Administration

Perhaps that’s a tad bit hyperbolic.  I mean it’s probably unfair to compare Google to meth-heads and low grade strippers.   Clearly Google and its DC proxies are much more dishonest and dangerous!

Let’s  do a quick round up of all the Obama Administration lame duck favors being called in by Google.  And remember this is just copyright and it’s still just the pre-lame duck session.  The election hasn’t even happened.  It’s gonna be insane after the election.  Taxpayers will be lucky if there’s any office furniture left in federal offices by the time inauguration day rolls around.

Read the post on The Trichordist

 

@MattBoone29: Death of the American Songwriter

Follow Ghost Town Troubadors on Twitter @ghosttowntroubs and visit their website at www.ghosttowntroubadors.com (h/t to David Lowery for the link)

BAKERSFIELD, Calif. (KBAK/KBFX) – Raising awareness of the struggles of American songwriters, the Ghost Town Troubadours played an intimate show Monday night at the Fox Theater.

The group is comprised of four hit songwriters who, while talented musicians in their own right, have spent much of their careers writing for other artists.

Their two-week tour from Nashville, Tennessee to Los Angeles comes amidst a major shakeup in the music industry as it shifts from selling songs to streaming them.

That new business model has created many issues when it comes to licensing music and how artists and songwriters get paid.

Because of this, the United States’ two main performing rights organizations, BMI and ASCAP, requested that the Department of Justice (DOJ) change parts of a consent decree that was first issued in 1941.

The two-year review ended on Aug. 4, with the DOJ denying the request.

The ruling was a blow to songwriters, who receive fractions of a penny each time one of their songs is played through a streaming service such as Pandora or Spotify.

“We’re the only trade industry in America that’s governed. Our rate is set by the government,” said Aaron Benward, a songwriter and member of the Ghost Town Troubadours.

The Troubadours, which include Benward, Danny Myrick, Regie Hamm and Travis Howard, decided to do something about it, embarking on a two-week tour, stopping at a city each night to play a show. Their mission was to share not only their music, but also their stories.

Read the post on Bakersfield Now

@marcps: Texas Governor Greg Abbott to Attorney General Loretta Lynch: Don’t Mess With Song Licensing

Governor Greg Abbott of Texas has submitted a letter of opposition to the Dept. of Justice regarding its recent decision to change how performance rights organizations (PROs) are required to treat the licensing of some songs with multiple authors.

The controversial change, part of a two-year review of the consent decrees established in the early 1940s to govern the PROs (namely ASCAP and BMI), now requires those PROs to allow “100 percent licensing,” which would give the partial owner of a song the ability to license the entire work to a user such as a streaming service, as long as they account for and pay the other songwriters.

In a letter dated Aug. 29 and addressed to Attorney General Loretta Lynch, Abbott says that he feels compelled to weigh in on the controversy due to his position as head of the Texas Music Office. “The Texas Music Office is housed within my office and is charged by law with promoting the Texas music industry. As the head of that office, I must object to the DOJ’s position in these cases, which is both legally flawed and threatens to harm the music industry in Texas.”

Read the post on Billboard

@musicrow: Texas Governor Objects To DOJ Ruling On Fractionalized Licensing

Texas Governor Greg Abbott has formally asked the Department of Justice to reconsider its recent decision regarding consent decrees and fractional licensing.

In a letter to Attorney General Loretta Lynch dated Aug. 29, Gov. Abbott wrote to express his disagreement.

He wrote, in part, “The Texas Music Office is housed within my office and is charged by law with promoting the Texas music industry. As the head of that office, I must object to the DOJ’s position in these cases, which is both legally flawed and threatens to harm the music industry in Texas. I respectfully request that the DOJ reconsider its position.”

Read the post on Music Row